©2018 by Action Wildlife Foundation

Our Wildlife Residents

American Elk

Native Land: North America and Canada

Habitat: Plains, grassy and wooded areas

Color / Markings:The sides of the Elk are gray-brown in winter and reddish-brown in summer. Pale yellowish rump, short tail and dark brown legs, belly and head.

Diet: Flowers, grasses, and tree bark

The American Elk is the second largest member of the deer family, surpassed in size only by the Moose.

Typically inactive during the day, they prefer to feed at night.  The female Elk travel and feed in large herds most of the year, while the males keep mostly to themselves or travel in smaller groups. A healthy male bull can have a harem size of 26 or more cows, especially in late August and September of each year for a four-week period when the bulls’ interest in mating is peaked. A bull mating call or “bugle” (A-a-a-ae-e-e-eeeeee-eough!) is meant as a warning to other bulls interested in invading the harem. Opposition and dominance is established through locking antlers during confrontations.

Female Elk weigh between 450-600 lbs. and stand 4 ft. at the shoulder, while males can weigh 700-900 lbs. and stand 5 ft. at shoulder height with antlers weighing 6-30 lbs.  Both bulls and cows have excellent senses of sight, hearing and smell, with a maximum life expectancy of 15 years.

Aoudad

Native Land: Northern Africa   

Habitat: Dry mountainous, desert regions

Color / Markings:         Sandy colored coat, lighter on underside

Diet: Grasses, shrubs, and root


Aoudad adapt easily to rough barren and waterless habitats. They metabolically produce water and, therefore, can survive long periods without fresh water. These expert climbers live in small groups and are capable of ascending the steepest of slopes.  They are more active during the cooler times of the day, seeking shelter from the sun during the hotter periods in the day.

The aoudad is said to evenly link the gap separating the goat and sheep. Aoudads are cited for having an even number of traits representative of both species, plus an additional ten traits strictly unique to themselves.

At shoulder height the Aoudad measures between 2.5 and 3.7 feet tall, with weight ranging between 80 and 320 pounds. Both males and females have a long fringe of hair at their throats and on their short tails. Only the males have long hair on their chests and front legs.  The thick, triangular horns on both the male and female aoudad curl back, up and over their heads in a semi-circle and often reach 36 inches in length.  

Belted Galloway

Native Land: Norway and Scotland

                  

Habitat: Open plains, wooded and rocky areas.


Color / Markings: Black with White belt


The Galloway may be one of the oldest breed of cattle know to man.  Written records date back to 1530 describing this historic breed.  They were brought to Scotland by the Viking in the 15th century; to a region know as Gaul, later called Galloway. 


The Belted Galloway a sub- species of the original Galloway has a unique heavy doubled coat of long wavy hair developed as protection from the bitterly cold winds that blew across the bleak terrain of Scotland.  They have the ability to adapt to extremes of climate and thrive in adverse weather conditions.


The present Belted Galloway stock was introduced in the United States in 1948, from stock brought over from the British Isles.  The animals are extremely docile and easy to handle and have no horns.  They are long - lived and are protective of their newborns.  They are breed and raised for their lean, high quality meat.

Australian Black Swan

Native Land:          Australia and Tasmanian wetlands


Native to Australia and Tasmanian wetlands with new populations now being introduced into New Zealand. This large graceful bird is most often seen in captivity (i.e. private collections, city parks and large zoos). Both male and female swans have a red bill with a white band, gray feet and legs, and white primaries that are seen only if the swan is in flight.

They subsist primarily on water plants and when in the wild choose to live near fresh water, building their nests from large mounds of grasses and reeds.

In the wild, the Black Swan usually nests in June and July, but in the Northern Hemisphere it is not unlikely to find a pair nesting at different times throughout the year.  The nest clutch typically consists of 5 to 8 seven large greenish eggs that are incubated by both parents for approximately 36 days.

The Black Swan's call is said to sound musical, resembling a trumpet. When alarmed or when strangers approach their young, the swan raises its long neck to sound a warning call.  They are even known to attack passersby, so it is wise to have them penned and separated from viewers to any farm.

The Black Swan is the emblem on the State of Western Australia's state seal.

Dexter Cattle

Native Land:                          Southern Ireland


Habitat:                                  Farm Land


Diet:                                               Grass, hay, and other vegetation.


Color / Markings:                 Solid black, Red or dun is less common



Dexter cattle are the smallest North American breed of cattle. Because of this small size they make an ideal cow for small family farms. Dexter cattle were originally brought to the U.S. in 1912 from Ireland and quickly became popular due to their ideal size for the small family farms of the time.


A bull may weigh up to 800 lb. and stand 47" tall and the cow may weigh up to 650 lb. and stand 43".

This is rare breed with only about 5000 worldwide.

Domestic Sheep

Native Land:                          World Wide


Habitat:                                  Domestic sheep are extremly versitile and exist in a wide variety of                                               habitats worldwide ranging from temperate mountain forests to                                                  desert conditions.


Color / Markings:                 Grass, weeds and shrubs on range. Also grain and hay on farm in                                                     winter



The domestic sheep can weigh 100-225 pounds for ewes (Female); 150-350 pounds for rams  (Male) . Horns of rams usually curve outward. In some breeds both rams and ewes have horns; other breeds are hornless. They have cloven hoofs and slim ankles. Muscular upper legs help them move quickly and easily. They have no upper incisors, but have 8 lower incisors. They also have 6 grinding teeth on the back part of each jaw. Most sheep have tails, but these are docted (removed)   for reason of cleanliness. Sheep are classified into four groups, depending upon their fleece. These are: fine wool, crossbred wool, medium wool, and coarse wool.

Emu

Native Land:                          Australia


Habitat:                                  Grassland and Savannas

Diet:                                        Grass, seeds, flowers, young plants, and fruit. They also eat some insects (including caterpillars).

       


The Emu is a large, flightless bird.  It is the second-biggest bird in Australia and the third-biggest bird in the world (only the ostrich and cassowary are bigger). The emu is also very fast; they can run up to 30 mph (50 kph). Emus also swim very well.

They swallow small stones (called gastroliths or gizzard stones) which stay in

the gizzard and help grind up food.

This huge bird lives in flocks (groups). The emu's life span is 10-20 years. Emus grow to be about 6 feet (185 cm) tall and weigh about 110 pounds (50 kg). This is bigger than many adult humans.

European Wild Boars

Native Land:                  Europe and Asia


Habitat:                          Woodlands and grasslands


Color / Markings:         Brown or dark gray to black


The Wild Boar first lived in Asia, migrated into Europe many hundreds of years ago.  The European Wild Boar is the principle ancestor of the domestic pig we have today.  As a result of Humans influence, the European Wild Boar can be found world wild,


The European Wild Boar has characteristics that set them apart from other species or boars.  The colors are either brown or gray to black, they are shorter than our domestic pig, have longer and narrower snout, and coarse bristle hair that is heavier in the winter months.  They also have four tusks which will grow continuously throughout there life.


European Boars are primarily active during twilight and early morning hours. When out during the heat of the day, they will wallow in the mud in order to protect there skin from the harmful suns rays.

Fainting Goats

Native Land:                  United States


Habitat:                          Farmland and shrub land


Color / Markings:         Variety of colors



The “Fainting Goat” is not actually fainting and the name is misleading.  A genetic problem with their muscles cause the goat to stiffen its legs and fall over when startled or surprised.  Older goats learn to lean against fences, buildings or rocks, and are better at staying in an upright position than younger Fainting goats.  They are also known as Nervous or Stiff – legged goats.


Fainting goats today are descended from a few that were bred in 1880’s in the state of Tennessee.  Once close to extinction, they have been bred back to where they are no longer endangered.


Used primarily for meat, they were also used to protect flocks of sheep.  With a Fainting goat were mixed in the flock of sheep, when a predator would approach, the goat would stiffen and fall over while the sheep would run away, at which time the goat became an easy meal for the predator and saved the more valuable sheep.  Today they are mainly pets and exhibit animals.

Fallow Deer

Native Land:                  Europe and Asia Minor


Habitat:         


Color / Markings:         White, spotted (light or dark) and almost black      


They were introduced to Australia in the 1830's.  Deer farming in the United States started in the early 1970's when people started looking for alternative land uses and healthier dietary options.


Fallow Deer bucks have large palmated antlers.    What that means is they have a flat surface like a moose

Ibex Goat

Native Land:                  Germany, Switzerland and Tirol


Habitat:                          Cliff Dwellers


It resembles the common goat, but is larger, and its horns are much longer; they are sometimes considerably more than a yard in length, beautifully curved, and surrounded by many curious rings or ridges.

The Nubian ibex is very agile when it comes to maneuvering steep cliffs.  It spends much of its day moving up and down precipitous terrain.  It may come down to graze during the day and then return to the cliffs in the evening.  It is most active in the morning and late afternoon, but during the midday heat the ibex tends to lay in the shade.  In the summer it moves further up the mountain to avoid the heat. 


The ibex feeds during the night in the highest woods that grow on the mountains; but as soon as the sun rises it begins to climb, eating the grass or whatever it finds, till it has got up where it is too high for trees to grow. They go in small companies of eight or ten, and lie down in sunny places among the rocks while the sun is hot; but about three or four o'clock in the afternoon they begin to go down again towards the woods. They can climb up rather more easily than they can get down, because there fore legs are shorter than the others.

Jacob Sheep

Native Land:                  Mediterranean roots

               


The Jacob is an ancient breed, sometimes referred to as a primitive breed. They are small in stature. Both males (rams) and females (ewes) are horned, generally one or two pairs (two or four horns) with some rams and ewes having up to six horns.  The ram has larger and more striking horns. The two-horned ram has the classic more horizontal double curled horn; the four-horned ram has two vertical center horns, which may be up to two feet or more in length and two smaller side horns, which grow down along the sides of the ram's head. The horns on the ewe are smaller in diameter, shorter in length and appear more delicate than those of the ram. The horns and hooves should be black or black with white or yellow striations. An all white hoof is less in keeping with the historic Jacob. All white horns are not accepted by the breed associations.


Jacob ewes generally cycle in the cooler months of the fall (cooler weather also restores the potency of the ram) and have one or two lambs (triplets are not rare) in the spring. Ewes will begin to cycle during the first fall following their birth and most often the ewe's first lamb is a single. The Jacob ewe is an excellent protective mother. Because of it's primitive anatomy with a low tail dock and non meat type build, she is a very easy lambing ewe. The lambs will exhibit their spotting and horn characteristics (2-4 horns) at birth, with the horn buds being more readily apparent on ram lambs. Lambs may be weaned at two months of age, but many shepherds to not separate lambs and allow the ewe to wean the lamb at about 4 months of age.

Japanese Sika Deer

Native Land:                  Eastern Asia

Habitat:                          Marshes, swamps, and associated woodlands

Color / Markings:         Mottled with white spots, chestnut brown or reddish                                           brown in color


Fossils indicate their origins may have been Japan. These highly adaptable nocturnal grazers move from marshy areas to dense undergrowth of forests and eat everything from fallen leaves, soy beans, corn, and even poison ivy. They are considered sacred in Japan and are highly valued in China for their antlers, which are used for medicinal purposes.

Sika deer usually only have one calf whereas white-tailed deer commonly have two fawns. Sika deer males (stags) are very territorial and keep harems of females (cows) during the breeding season or rut.

Llama

Llama



Native land:                   South America


Habitat:                          Grassland of the high Andes Mountains


Color / Markings:         Multicolored



Forty million years ago, which are know as the new world camel, were native to North America 3 million years ago they migrated to South America.  They were then wiped out of North America by the last ice age (about 11,000 years ago). 


Llamas live about 20 years.  They grow up to 6 feet tall and average 325 pounds.  Llamas adapt easily to harsh climates.  They are extremely healthy and generally free of disease.


Llamas are intelligent, sensitive animals.  Their wonderful personalities and gentle nature enables them to be fantastic pets.  Although calm, llamas do spit.  Spitting is the way a llama expresses that he is nervous or threatened.  It is a direct hint to back off.


Llamas may also be used as guardians for smaller animals such as sheep and goats.  Their curios nature instincts attract them to approaching predators (like coyotes), who in turn, sense danger and run away. 

Miniature Donkey

Native Land:                  Mediterranean islands of Sicily and Sardinia


Habitat:                          Valley and hillsides


Color / Markings:         Any color from brown, white, tan, chestnut and

        anything on between.


Size:                                31”  to 38”    /   200 to 450 lbs.


Diet:                                Fresh grass and hay


Used widely in Sicily and Sardinia as pack animals and beast of

burden, the same is not true in the United States.   The main attraction

in this country, are as pets.


Miniature donkeys have loving personalities and form close

attachments with there owners.  They are very laidback and easy

going animals that make wonderful pets for children or adults.


Donkeys will communicate with their owners by “braying” or “hee-

hawing”.  They also developed schedules and will let their owners  know when they

are hungry or want some attention.  Long lived,  properly cared for donkeys can

live30 to 40 years.

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!

Elephants

One of the fan favorites our visitors always mention are the Elephants. Time and time again, we get feedback about how much people love their experience with our Elephants. Our trainers and staff are always doing their best to keep both the animals and our guests happy. Curious to see what they look like in real life? Want to learn more? Stop by and visit the zoo today!

Lions

Introducing one of the biggest crowd pleasers at Action Wildlife: our Lions. These animals know how to make our guests smile, and put on a great show every time. You will love walking through our interactive exhibits and exploring the fun and interesting facts about all of the animals we have at Action Wildlife.

Lemurs

With some truly spectacular habits and mannerisms, our Lemurs attract many visitors to Action Wildlife each year. These animals are real people pleasers at heart, who love seeing and interacting with our guests in their own unique, and entertaining ways. Want to stop by and explore on your own, with friends or with your family? Want to find out more? Check them out for yourself!